The Lighthouse Mission

It has been a while since the last post … sincere apologies for that. Life has a way of just stacking up on you, and then there are not enough hours in a day to get all done.  I promise to time manage better this year.

First off … a new addition to our list of projects to keep others warm.  I received an email from Ann S.  about The Lighthouse Mission, an organization that does many wonderful things for the needy in Long Island, NY, among which is to distribute food to them.  At the long lines for the food, there were many who did not have warm winter clothes, and if we could send them anything?  Well, of course we could.

lighthouse mission

 

I packed up three boxes of your wonderful creations, and shipped them out.  Since it was late at night and almost falling asleep, I also forgot to include a card or flyer about us.  No matter.  I’ll pack up another box when I can, and include everything in that box.

Check out on What We’re Working On for more details on this, and other projects.

And sincere thanks for all that you do to help and support this cause.

 

A change of pace – crocheting

A change of pace – crocheting

marissafh:

Here’s an idea for your hats … a band around the edge. Go to Ravelry for the pattern (http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/banded-toque-with-shell-edge)

Originally posted on Lisa Adcock Designs:

Yes, the Knitwit can crochet! Actually, I have many more years of crochet experience than knitting although I much prefer knitting. I wanted a change so I decided to do some stashbusting and make a few hats for charity. The result? A new hat pattern published on Ravelry.com this morning called “Banded toque with shell edge“.

turquoise hat

lavendar hat

The hat uses a specialty yarn from Jo-Ann’s called Wave. I’ve had it in my stash for a few years because I hadn’t figured out how to use until I realized I could embellish a plain hat with it! Crocheting with it required me to slow down and make sure I pulled each of my loops through the stitches so I wasn’t crocheting too tightly. I suppose the other option would have been for me to increase my hook size for the decorative band.

What kind of colors can you make in…

View original 21 more words

Dasani

As the main page of the New York Times opened up, a headline from the sidebar caught my eye.

‘Over 22,000 homeless children in New York city …”

What?  So much?  I clicked on the article to read it.  It was the last of a five-part series, and so I started from the top.

‘Invisible Child’ – an investigative series by Andrea Elliot of the New York Times, follows Dasani and her family for about a year.  It chronicles the daily life of a homeless child, their highlights, and more often than not, the downsides of daily life.

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Image courtesy of the New York Times

As I read the series, I was dismayed.  We see the homeless adults walking about on the street;  but we don’t see the children of these.  We see a family out on the street, and as we look at them, we can see that they are low-income families.  But I don’t see them as homeless.  And as I read the article, this is what I am thinking.  They are not homeless – the government provides a shelter for them.  A horrible place to stay in and live, to be sure, but there is a place for them to go to at night.  They are not out on the street; they don’t have to sleep out on the street.

But as the article shows, being ‘homeless’ just doesn’t mean that you are living out on the streets and sidewalks, under bridges, ramps, or against a fence.  It also means that you don’t have a permanent place of your own, where you can sleep knowing that you are safe under a roof.  It also means that you have to put up with a government-run shelter, living in a one-bedroom apartment, and subject to the bureaucracy of a government that cannot provide a building with good living conditions.

How the government can allow families to live in conditions such as those shelters that Dasani and her family were staying in is another discussion for another time.  I only hope that with the attention that Dasani and this piece is getting right now will continue on to the upper levels of the government, and that they will actually do something about improving the system.

At the end of the series, Dasani and her family have moved to another government shelter, on the west side of Manhattan.  This one looks to be considerably better than the one they left; it’s an actual apartment, with a kitchen.  I hope to see Dasani one day, and see how she is doing.  With the exposure brought on by this article,  I do hope and pray that she breaks the cycle of life that she has been born into.

I will be looking into how we can help with helping the children of the shelters.  That’s a whole new world that I am now aware of.  And when I see children running about on the streets, I will be thinking of this article and Dasani.

I hope you do too.

 

 

 

King Gopher, THD

Here’s a cause that was brought to my attention, and although it’s not for the homeless, I was immediately hooked when I read that hats and scarves were needed for gifts for children who had lost their hair due to their medical conditions.  Best of all, it’s being given to them by King Gopher – a therapy and helping dog!  Isn’t that wonderful?

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HRH King Gopher, THD

 

I know that you’re all busy these days with your Christmas gifts and other personal causes.  But in between the soon to come hectic chaos, one can whip up a hat and scarf set for a child in green and purple colours (two of my favourite colours, by the way!)

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Image courtesy of HRH King Gopher

Complete details on the cause can be found here.

I’m off to dig through my stash – I know I have green and purple yarn in the boxes somewhere.

Hope you join me.

 

Three Boxes Full

Big donation in … Diane, from Clifton, NJ dropped off three boxes of hats, scarves, and gloves!  Thank you so much!

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And she has also nicely matched and bundled them up, ready for giving.

And this is the best idea yet … Buy the gloves, and then knit or crochet a hat and scarf to match the gloves, and you’ve got an almost-instant set!

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Isn’t that a great idea?  I don’t know how to knit mittens and gloves … why didn’t I think of that before?  Those ‘magic’ one-size-fits-all gloves from the 99-cent stores are always good; I’ve seen some good ones on sale at Walmart’s too.

I’m getting all excited to start this up again, specially now that the cold winds are here.

Aren’t you?

Fall is Here!

Fall is here!

Hope you’re all doing fine, and had a good summer!

The summer breezed by me so fast, it ended too soon.  And somewhere in between, none of the hats I was working on would work out … it was too big, it was too small, it had a weird shape, it wouldn’t take shape …

A friend said that it was still too hot to make hats, so maybe I should wait until the weather got cooler.

Well, it’s 20 degrees cooler here now … maybe the hats will take shape when I work on them?

Here’s what I managed to finish so far.  I wanted to try out Lion Brand’s new yarn, Unique.  That’s the two blue hats in front – the big one on the right, and the smaller one in the middle.  Then there’s the red-fuschia-orange-brown behind them.  I love variegated yarn … it makes for interesting colour patterns without the hustle of colour changes, when you don’t have time for that.  The pattern is a simple single crochet all around, or half double crochet around.   On the other hats, I started off with the ribbed pattern for the NYCHHI Hat, then finished off the body with the crochet seed stitch for a bit of texture.

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I’m also finally getting a chance to open up the packages received over the summer.  If you’ve sent something in, apologies that it’s taking so long to acknowledge and post photos of your items.  It’s been such a hectic summer, but I promise that I will be posting them.

Thanks for all your help and support of this cause!

Covenant House New York

Covenant House was started over 30 years ago in the lower east side of Manhattan, when six young runaways were given shelter during a snowstorm.  Today, there are programs in 21 U.S. cities and Latin America, and over 70,000 young people come to Covenant House for shelter.

Hook:  H8/5.0mm

Covenant House New York is the largest adolescent care agency, serving the homeless, runaway and at-risk youth.  On average, 300 youth come through the doors of Covenant House New York each night for shelter and nourishment.  I imagine that perhaps more than that will enter through the doors during the cold months of winter.

This will be an ongoing need for the winter items, and I am aiming for 500 items to be donated to Covenant House New York by the end of the year.  But however many we can make will help keep one more youth warm.

Need:       hats, scarves, blankets
Size:         for 16-21 year olds
Amount:   500 (items)
Target:     October – November 2013

Please join us in helping the nation’s youth to keep warm during the winter months.