6 Boxes

IMG_7952 I got notifications that I had six boxes to be picked up.  wow – the six boxes were here.  Lisa O had told me that she had shipped off six boxes to NYCHHI.  I was excited to see what was in it.

We unloaded them, and Justin decided he wanted to play jenga with them.  Silly boy.

But I couldn’t open them right away – I had to wait until the weekend to open them up.  I wanted to take my time to enjoy going through the boxes, and not rush through them.

Want to know what’s inside?  Here they are … Ready?

… 32 baby hats … and a blanket/afghan.  Don’t you just love those colours?

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… 8 scarves  …

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… and granny squares … and a skein of yarn to join them together.

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How many granny squares?  206.  Yep.  206 of them – I counted them all.

Joining party, anybody?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summer Donations

I finally managed to sort through the donations that came in over the summer. For some, I did manage a quick photo and post over on the Facebook page, but not on here because I wanted to feature them properly.  Next time, I’ll do better and post quick posts to both.

Yarn donations came in anonymously.  Thank you so much for these.  If you see your donation here, let me know, so that we can thank you properly.

 

I also had two meet-ups – thanks to Kerri and Joanne for your generous contributions!

And there was an anonymous hats donation that came in.  Well, I couldn’t find the name on the box/packaage/return label.  So if this is your donation, please let us know so that we can thank you properly.

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Hats, scarves and blanket from Diane K and Cyndy S.   Thanks so much for your generous contributions!

We are off to a great start this year, and ready for the winter cold!

Thank you all for your help and support of the cause.

 

 

 

 

Getting Ready for the Cold Winds

Hello all!  I hope this finds you well and summer is treating you well!
I know … it’s almost the end of summer … those cold winds are coming back … we’re all going to be bundled up again … I’m not ready for that so soon!  Well, we can’t stop Mother Nature either …

So it’s time to pick up hooks, needles and yarn to work on winter items before the cold winds blow in.  We received some yarn donations and I picked up this bright-coloured ball of yarn, and came up with this.

 

 

 

I really like how this turned out.  I’ve written out the pattern for the hat, which can be found here.

Enjoy the pattern.  I hope to be able to get a few of these done before the cold winds come …

 

 

 

 

The Lighthouse Mission

It has been a while since the last post … sincere apologies for that. Life has a way of just stacking up on you, and then there are not enough hours in a day to get all done.  I promise to time manage better this year.

First off … a new addition to our list of projects to keep others warm.  I received an email from Ann S.  about The Lighthouse Mission, an organization that does many wonderful things for the needy in Long Island, NY, among which is to distribute food to them.  At the long lines for the food, there were many who did not have warm winter clothes, and if we could send them anything?  Well, of course we could.

lighthouse mission

 

I packed up three boxes of your wonderful creations, and shipped them out.  Since it was late at night and almost falling asleep, I also forgot to include a card or flyer about us.  No matter.  I’ll pack up another box when I can, and include everything in that box.

Check out on What We’re Working On for more details on this, and other projects.

And sincere thanks for all that you do to help and support this cause.

 

A change of pace – crocheting

A change of pace – crocheting

marissafh:

Here’s an idea for your hats … a band around the edge. Go to Ravelry for the pattern (http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/banded-toque-with-shell-edge)

Originally posted on Lisa Adcock Designs:

Yes, the Knitwit can crochet! Actually, I have many more years of crochet experience than knitting although I much prefer knitting. I wanted a change so I decided to do some stashbusting and make a few hats for charity. The result? A new hat pattern published on Ravelry.com this morning called “Banded toque with shell edge“.

turquoise hat

lavendar hat

The hat uses a specialty yarn from Jo-Ann’s called Wave. I’ve had it in my stash for a few years because I hadn’t figured out how to use until I realized I could embellish a plain hat with it! Crocheting with it required me to slow down and make sure I pulled each of my loops through the stitches so I wasn’t crocheting too tightly. I suppose the other option would have been for me to increase my hook size for the decorative band.

What kind of colors can you make in…

View original 21 more words

Dasani

As the main page of the New York Times opened up, a headline from the sidebar caught my eye.

‘Over 22,000 homeless children in New York city …”

What?  So much?  I clicked on the article to read it.  It was the last of a five-part series, and so I started from the top.

‘Invisible Child’ – an investigative series by Andrea Elliot of the New York Times, follows Dasani and her family for about a year.  It chronicles the daily life of a homeless child, their highlights, and more often than not, the downsides of daily life.

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Image courtesy of the New York Times

As I read the series, I was dismayed.  We see the homeless adults walking about on the street;  but we don’t see the children of these.  We see a family out on the street, and as we look at them, we can see that they are low-income families.  But I don’t see them as homeless.  And as I read the article, this is what I am thinking.  They are not homeless – the government provides a shelter for them.  A horrible place to stay in and live, to be sure, but there is a place for them to go to at night.  They are not out on the street; they don’t have to sleep out on the street.

But as the article shows, being ‘homeless’ just doesn’t mean that you are living out on the streets and sidewalks, under bridges, ramps, or against a fence.  It also means that you don’t have a permanent place of your own, where you can sleep knowing that you are safe under a roof.  It also means that you have to put up with a government-run shelter, living in a one-bedroom apartment, and subject to the bureaucracy of a government that cannot provide a building with good living conditions.

How the government can allow families to live in conditions such as those shelters that Dasani and her family were staying in is another discussion for another time.  I only hope that with the attention that Dasani and this piece is getting right now will continue on to the upper levels of the government, and that they will actually do something about improving the system.

At the end of the series, Dasani and her family have moved to another government shelter, on the west side of Manhattan.  This one looks to be considerably better than the one they left; it’s an actual apartment, with a kitchen.  I hope to see Dasani one day, and see how she is doing.  With the exposure brought on by this article,  I do hope and pray that she breaks the cycle of life that she has been born into.

I will be looking into how we can help with helping the children of the shelters.  That’s a whole new world that I am now aware of.  And when I see children running about on the streets, I will be thinking of this article and Dasani.

I hope you do too.